Author: East Texas Review

Is the American Empire Worth the Price?

By Patrick Buchanan When a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight,” Samuel Johnson observed, “it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” And the prospect of a future where Kim Jong Un can put a nuclear weapon on a U.S. city is going to cause this nation to reassess the risks and rewards of the American Imperium. First, some history. “Why should Americans be first to die in any second Korean war?” this writer asked in 1999 in “A Republic, Not an Empire.” “With twice the population of the North and twenty times its economic power, South Korea...

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Teacher Training debut at U.T Tyler University

The University of Texas at Tyler and Greater Texas Foundation have partnered to enrich math education in East Texas. With a $203,296 GTF grant, The University of Texas at Tyler offers “Middle Math Matters” training to Grades 6 – 8 mathematics educators in rural area school districts. For associate professor of mathematics education Dr. John Lamb, it’s the perfect equation to enhance intermediate math education in East Texas by providing quality professional development for rural area teachers. “Our focus is on rural and smaller communities. We utilize our face-to-face time and online tools to help connect teachers across East...

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The Devices We Depend On: How Social Is Social Media?

By Jamie Stiehm In our semisweet summer in the city, far from sandy Nantucket Island and grassy Bedminster, New Jersey, I have some behavioral notes on my fellow humans here — residents and visitors alike — stored up from autumn, winter and spring. First, “situational awareness” is eroded by the devices we depend on to make it from moment to moment, place to place. Bumping into people’s heads on the sidewalk happens. We put religious faith in our GPS to navigate our way through the days and streets — and somehow know them less well. Situational awareness, by the...

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The Shameful Blackout of Thomas, Sowell and Williams

By Larry Elder Clarence Thomas, one of nine members of the Supreme Court and the second black to ever join the Court, is not in the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Asked to explain Thomas’ absence, the chief spokeswoman for the Smithsonian said, “The museum’s exhibitions are based on themes, not individuals.” Yet the museum plans to add a popular local D.C. television news broadcaster. The museum’s founding director, Lonnie Bunch, said the broadcaster “symbolized that it was really important that America was changing and his presence was a symbol of that change.”...

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Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Bluegrass Band to play Liberty Hall

On Saturday, Aug. 19 at 8 p.m., Liberty Hall will bring Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Bluegrass Band to the stage. What if The Beatles were actually from the Black Mountain Hills of Dakota? Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Bluegrass Band is a collection of four very different musicians reimagining the greatest music ever written by the greatest band to ever take the stage-The Beatles. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Bluegrass Band’s repertoire features new and innovative takes on songs like “Here Comes the Sun,” “Come Together,” “Blackbird” and many more. “Anyone who loves the Beatles will love this band,” said Communications Manager Julie Goodgame....

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