‘Neil Gorsuch got 54 votes when he was confirmed, and I think Brett Kavanaugh brings a similar academic and experience background and judicial philosophy that I think most people on my side of the aisle will find acceptable.’

 

‘I think it would be hard to explain why did you vote to confirm Gorsuch and you vote against Kavanaugh.’

 

Today U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) appeared on CBS’s Face the Nation to discuss President Trump’s meeting with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki and Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. Excerpts from his appearance are below.

On the Nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court:

 

“Neil Gorsuch got 54 votes when he was confirmed, and I think Brett Kavanaugh brings a similar academic and experience background and judicial philosophy that I think most people on my side of the aisle will find acceptable. But I know everybody feels serious about doing their job, doing their due diligence. As you know, the Constitution requires the Senate to provide ‘advice and consent,’ and I know a number of Senators who don’t yet know him are meeting him.”

 

On Democrats’ Opposition to Judge Kavanaugh and Calls by Some for Him to Recuse Himself of Potential Future Cases:

 

“I think it would be hard to explain why did you vote to confirm Gorsuch and you vote against Kavanaugh.”

 

“He is one of the finest lawyers our nation has to offer. So I have confidence he would make that decision appropriately if it were ever presented, but to me this is an indication of how much our friends across the aisle are stretching the hypothetical that if a case ever got in front of the Supreme Court and he were there, would he recuse. I’m confident he will follow the ethical guidance of the rules of judicial conduct and would handle that appropriately. But I think it’s really a sign of desperation.”

 

On the Upcoming Trump Meeting with Putin:

 

“I think it’s always helpful when leaders of nations talk to one another. To me, it would be counterproductive just to ignore that or to avoid that possibility. On the other hand, I think the President should be clear-eyed about who he’s dealing with. Putin is an autocrat. He’s a thug. He does not respect the rule of law. Obviously he doesn’t respect our democracy and wants to undermine it at every chance he gets.”

 

“The President needs to be, and I think he is, clear-eyed about who he’s dealing with but there are some areas where I think constructive conversations can occur.”